Joint Oversight Group - JOG



The TOR, Terms of Reference, specifies the role of the Joint Oversight Group, (JOG), which will be comprised of a Principal Member from each country.  As a first step, the Principal Members intend to designate at least one person per side to examine each of the six (6) potential areas of interest identified in the Joint Statement for the 2002 – 2003, and, if appropriate, to identify other opportunities for collaboration to satisfy provisions of the TOR. 

 

It is the intention that these project teams meet as necessary and will report their recommendations to the Principal Members of the JOG and other officials, as appropriate. For the U.S. side, other appropriate officials may include representatives from other government agencies.  For the Portuguese side, other appropriate officials would include representatives from the Ministry of the Environment and/or from the Center for Pollution Prevention.

 

Establishment of proposed projects will be subject to negotiation and conclusion of appropriate agreements between the participants and affected stakeholders.  Any initiative under the TOR will be the subject of international agreements between the two implementing agencies.  All initiatives under the TOR will be subject to the availability of appropriated funds, personnel, and other required.

 

 

 

2004 ANNUAL JOG MEETING

 

In September 2004, the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) hosted a JOG meeting at the NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The 2 day’s events consisted of technical meetings, followed by a special tour of KSC. 
 

The meeting was led by the C3P Director General and attended by representatives from C3P, NASA Headquarters, NASA KSC, the European Space Agency (ESA), International Trade Bridge, Inc. (ITB), the Instituto de Engenharia Mecânica e Gestăo Industrial (INEGI), and the Instituto de Soldadura e Qualidade (ISQ).

 

At the JOG meeting, an annual review of C3P’s activities and achievements were provided, including:
 

     ► Development of the Technical Projects between NASA and TAP/OGMA, namely the
         project “Identification of Suitable Alternatives to Hexavalent Chrome in conversion coatings
         Alodine 1200/1000 on AL 2024, 6061 and 7075”.

 

     ► C3P presence at the Farnborough Air Show, in July 2004, for dissemination of C3P
        
information and contacts with major international companies.

 

     ► Participation of C3P and ISQ as members in the Environmental Quality and Customer
         Support Committees/Working Groups of the Aerospace Defense Association of European
         Industries (ASD).

 

     ► Partnership-development with companies and industry associations outside of Portugal,
         such as:

 

űUnited Kingdom:  BAE Systems and TWI (The Welding Institute)
 

űSpain:  Spanish Innovation Development Foundation, INASMET
 

űPoland:  Various aerospace and defense companies

 

Discussions at the JOG wrapped up with presentations by NASA AP2 and ISQ concerning project areas for possible further development in 2005.  At least some of the new project areas derive from the findings of P2 assessments that NASA AP2 and C3P representatives performed of SMEs in Portugal during 2003. Promising project areas for C3P to explore in 2005 are the following:

 

 

1. Technology

Validation of suitable alternatives to hexavalent chrome (Cr+6) in conversion coatings and primer coatings for aluminium substrates.

 

Need

Chromate conversion coatings contain hexavalent chromium, a known human carcinogen that is strictly regulated.  In February 2003, the European Union (EU) passed sweeping legislation to establish an EU-wide electronics waste management infrastructure (WEEE) and to restrict the use of certain hazardous substances in high-tech equipment (RoHS).  Legislation includes the following restrictions on hexavalent chromium emissions in wastewater: No more than 0.1 mg/l (industrial discharge to surface water), 0.1 mg/l (metal finishing industry) and 2mg/l combined hex and trivalent chromium (leather tanning industry).  Additionally personal exposure limits are set at or below 0.5mg/m3 and emissions to air are greatly restricted.  Such limits could increase costs of the pretreatment of aluminium and aluminium alloys.  Within Portugal, this project will achieve the goal of reducing or eliminating the use of hexavalent chromium in aluminium finishing by demonstrating and validating the performance of alternatives.

 

Methodology

The project's joint technical team shall identify engineering, performance, and operational impact (supportability) requirements for paints containing hexavalent chromium (chemical conversion coatings and primers).  The technical team shall reach a consensus on testing requirements and acceptance criteria for evaluating innovative alternate coating technologies.  Data obtained from these tests is intended as a guide for implementation for each user and is not intended to be used for qualifying or excluding any alternative.  Users will select alternatives based on their respective business case.

 

A joint group consisting of technical representatives from C3P, ISQ, INEGI, technical stakeholders, affected program managers, and other government technical representatives shall identify application, performance, and operational impact (supportability) requirements.  This group shall then define critical test requirements, methodologies, and acceptance criteria to qualify the alternatives in user applications.

 

Affected Industry Sectors

Transportation Sector (automobile, train, aircraft), Metal Finishing Industry, Photography, Chromium Alloy and Chromium Metal Production.

 

Benefits

Alternative aluminum pretreatments have the potential to replace all hexavalent chromium pretreatment processes.  They may also be useful as a post treatment for sacrificial metallic coatings such as cadmium, zinc, tin-zinc, zinc-nickel, and IVD aluminum, and as a post treatment for anodized aluminum, replacing chromate-based formulations in those applications.

 

By working collaboratively, companies can expect to leverage resources and reduce duplication.  Past pollution prevention projects have shown returns on investment ranging from 4:1 to 12:1.

 

 

2. Technology

Identification, demonstration and validation of alternatives to high volatile organic compound (VOC) primers and topcoats containing methyl ethyl ketone, toluene, and xylene

 

Need

The objective of the C3P Low-VOC project is to identify and validate acceptable alternatives to currently used organic coatings containing the VOCs MEK, toluene, and xylene across Portuguese industrial sectors

 

Methodology

The project's joint technical team shall identify engineering, performance, and operational impact (supportability) requirements for paints containing VOCs above the pending Portuguese permissible limits.  The joint technical team shall conduct a technology survey in accordance with the C3P methodology to identify commercially available coatings and processes as candidates to replace current baseline coatings.

 

The technical team shall reach a consensus on testing requirements and acceptance criteria for evaluating alternate coating technologies.  Data obtained from these tests is intended as a guide for implementation for each user and is not intended to be used for qualifying or excluding any alternative.  Users will select alternatives based on their respective business case.

 

A joint group consisting of technical representatives from C3P, ISQ, INEGI, technical stakeholders, affected program managers, and other government technical representatives shall identify application, performance, and operational impact (supportability) requirements. This group shall then define critical test requirements, methodologies, and acceptance criteria to qualify the alternatives in user applications.

 

Affected Industry Sectors

Transportation Sector (automobile, train, aircraft), Shipyards, Construction Sector(commercial, residential and industrial), Paint Manufacturing Industry and other SME's.

 

Benefits

Potential benefits which stakeholders can expect to realize by implementing low-VOC topcoats and primers include:
 

ű Reduced VOC emissions;

ű More efficient production, since many paints are generally easier to apply and clean
       up;

ű Decreases hazardous waste generation (and decreased operating costs) because
      overspray may be recaptured, and the process does not generate spent cleanup
      solvents;

ű Reduced compliance risk;

ű Reduced health and safety requirements for workers;

ű In some cases, a more durable coating.
 

By working collaboratively, companies can expect to leverage resources and reduce duplication.  Past pollution prevention projects have shown returns on investment ranging from 4:1 to 12:1.

 

  

3. Technology

Demonstration of innovative VOC emission control technology for use in industrial applications. 

 

Need

VOCs are of great concern to nearly all industrial facilities.  Emissions of VOCs are generated through a variety of processes such as painting, surface cleaning, dry cleaning and machining.  Additionally to this, VOCs can be generated by ancillary industrial equipment such as boilers and burners.  European Union Regulations are forcing industries within the EU to evaluate currently used VOC control technologies in addition to seeking low-VOC and no-VOC options for materials used in their processes. 

 

While post generation filtration or capture of VOCs is secondary to process and materials changes, critical processes require time to validate alternative processes and materials.  These post generation technologies will be required in numerous facilities across numerous sectors within Portugal prior to the EU regulatory compliance deadline.

 

Methodology

A joint group led by C3P and consisting of technical representatives from ISQ, INEGI, affected national companies/organizations, and other government technical representatives shall use innovative means to identify the engineering, performance, and operational impact (supportability) for VOC control technologies in industrial processes.

 

This group shall then define via consensus the test procedures and acceptance criteria to qualify candidate VOC control technologies against these requirements.  It is noted that some performance criteria defined are industry, facility or process specific and that failure in any test does not necessarily disqualify the candidate VOC control technology for use in another application.

 

VOC control technologies shall be demonstrated in the application categories across national interests, including, but not limited to: Painting / Coating Operations, Chemical Coating Removal Operations, Surface Preparation, Surface Cleaning, Solvent Cleaning Operations Dry Cleaning Operations, Textile Manufacturing and Processing Operations, and Ink, Dye and Paint Manufacturing and Processing.

 

Affected Industry Sectors

Industrial Sectors above as well as: Transportation Sector (automobile, train, aircraft), Shipyards, Paint Manufacturing Industry and other SME's.

 

Benefits

Innovative and cost-efficient membrane solutions are available for a wide variety of applications and industries.  Membrane manufacturers typically employ a network of research and development resources to assure the latest technology for customized solutions.  Potential benefits which stakeholders can expect to realize by implementing VOC emission control technologies include:


Reduced VOC emissions and environmental regulatory compliance;


Ability to customize the system to treat high- or low-levels of VOCs, and multiple
    contaminants;


Implementation can often be accomplished with minimal disruption of operations;


Financial payback on investment, frequently.

 

By working collaboratively, companies can expect to leverage resources and reduce duplication.  Past pollution prevention projects have shown returns on investment ranging from 4:1 to 12:1.

 

 

 

4. Technology

Validation of alternatives to lead-containing dry film lubricants for antigalling/antifretting, antiseizing, and assembly aid applications

 

Need

Dry Film Lubricants (DFLs) are applied to components of engines to prevent galling, fretting, and seizing at temperatures up to 1400°F.  DFLs also aid in assembly of engines by providing lubrication and protecting against nicks and scratches.  These DFLs are applied to a wide variety of metal substrates.  Many of the DFLs currently used by turbine engine manufacturers contain lead or other materials that cause environmental or health concerns, such as VOCs, antimony, cadmium, and carcinogenic chemicals.  The C3P Lead-Free DFL project is intended to reduce worker exposure to and disposal of HazMats by identifying and validating more environmentally friendly DFLs that meet performance requirements.

 

Methodology

A joint group led by C3P and consisting of technical representatives from ISQ, INEGI, affected national companies/organizations, and other government technical representatives shall identify the engineering, performance, and operational impact (supportability) requirements for dry film lubricants in antiseizing, antigalling/antifretting, and assembly aid applications.   This group shall then define via consensus the tests procedures and acceptance criteria to qualify innovative alternatives against these technical requirements.

 

Non-lead DFLs shall be qualified in the application categories across national interest, including, but not limited to, the following:


low- and high-temperature antigalling/antifretting applications, used to protect part
    surfaces against sliding and oscillating wear;


low- and high-temperature antiseizing applications, applied to threaded fasteners at

    assembly to facilitate subsequent disassembly.

 

Affected Industry Sectors

Transportation Sector (automobile, train, aircraft), Shipyards and other SME's.

 

Benefits

Potential benefits which stakeholders can expect to realize by implementing a lead-free dry film lubricant include:


Reduced emissions;


Reduced waste management costs;


Reduced compliance risk;


Reduced worker exposure risk.

 

By working collaboratively, companies can expect to leverage resources and reduce duplication.  Past pollution prevention projects have shown returns on investment ranging from 4:1 to 12:1.

 

 

5. Technology

Validation of suitable low-VOC and HazMat free technologies for depainting on aluminum and composite substrates

 

Need

Surface preparation and/or depainting is a necessary preparation step to ensure proper adhesion of a newly applied coating.  The level of cleanliness and/or anchor profile desired is typically a function of the type of coating to be applied and the specification being adhered to.  Across Portugal the dominant surface preparation technologies involve hazardous chemical strippers or pressurized abrasive technologies that generate large quantities of hazardous and contaminated primary and secondary waste or fugitive emissions.

 

Methodology

In response to global environmental concern and recent technological developments regarding surface preparation technologies, a Portuguese national project shall be undertaken to identify where hazardous surface preparation technologies are used in Portugal and to identify and qualify innovative alternative technologies.  The project's joint technical team shall identify engineering, performance, and operational impact (supportability) requirements of non-hazardous surface preparation/depainting technologies for Portuguese industries, and design innovative replacement test protocols.

 

The major requirements against which new non-hazardous surface preparation technologies will be defined, and may include:  Ease of use; Coating strip rate; Waste generation; Warping/Denting; Hazardous material/chemical constituency; and Environmental, Safety and Occupational Health properties.

 

A joint group consisting of technical representatives from C3P, ISQ, INEGI, technical stakeholders, affected program managers, and other government technical representatives shall identify application, performance, and operational impact (supportability) requirements.  This group shall then define critical test requirements, methodologies, and acceptance criteria to qualify the alternatives in user applications.

 

Affected Industry Sectors

Transportation Sector (automobile, train, aircraft), Shipyards, Construction Sector (commercial, residential and industrial) and other SME's.

 

Benefits

Potential benefits which stakeholders can expect to realize by implementing a low-VOC/ HazMat-free depainting process include:


Ability to produce up to 85% less waste material compared to chemical stripping;


Reduction or elimination of VOCs used as strippers that are associated with the
   formation of smog typically regulated by national air pollution laws;
 

Reduce personal protective equipment;


Often user-friendly processes available as fully developed stand-alone systems;


Typically minimal effect on the surfaces beneath the paint;


Some of the alternative blast media are a plentiful natural resource, inexpensive, and non-toxic;


Reduction in operating costs of 50 % or more compared to chemical paint stripping.
 

 

By working collaboratively, companies can expect to leverage resources and reduce duplication.  Past pollution prevention projects have shown returns on investment ranging from 4:1 to 12:1.


 

 

 


Last updated: 26/02/2009